Tools and tips to help you
stay safe online.

We automatically protect your privacy with industry-leading security. There are a few additional steps that you can take to manage your online security and choose the right level of protection for you.

Strengthen the security
of your Google Account.

Security Checkup

Take the Security Checkup

One easy way to protect your Google Account is to take the Security Checkup. This step-by-step tool gives you personalised and actionable recommendations to help to strengthen the security of your Google Account.

2-STEP VERIFICATION

Defend against hackers with 2‑Step Verification

2-Step Verification helps to keep out anyone who shouldn’t have access to your account by requiring you to use a secondary factor on top of your username and password to log in to your account. For those who are at risk of targeted online attacks and need even stronger protections, we’ve created the Advanced Protection Programme.

A little help with
your passwords.

Use strong and unique passwords

Creating a strong, unique password for every account is one of the most critical steps that you can take to protect your privacy. Using the same password to log in to multiple accounts, such as your Google Account, social media profiles and retail websites, increases your security risk.

Keep track of all your passwords

A password manager, like the one built into your Google Account, helps to protect and keep track of the passwords that you use on sites and apps. Google’s Password Manager helps to you create, remember and securely store all your passwords to safely and easily sign in to your accounts.

Check your passwords for security issues

Check the strength and security of all of your saved passwords with a quick Password Checkup. Learn if any of your saved passwords for third-party sites or accounts have been compromised, and easily change them if needed.

Use strong and unique passwords

Creating a strong, unique password for every account is one of the most critical steps that you can take to protect your privacy. Using the same password to log in to multiple accounts, such as your Google Account, social media profiles and retail websites, increases your security risk.

Keep track of all your passwords

A password manager, like the one built into your Google Account, helps to protect and keep track of the passwords that you use on sites and apps. Google’s Password Manager helps to you create, remember and securely store all your passwords to safely and easily sign in to your accounts.

Check your passwords for security issues

Check the strength and security of all of your saved passwords with a quick Password Checkup. Learn if any of your saved passwords for third-party sites or accounts have been compromised, and easily change them if needed.

Keep your devices secure.
Browse the web safely.
A phone featuring a notification that a connection is secure
Avoid online scams and
phishing attempts

Know how scammers might reach you

Scammers can take advantage of goodwill by disguising their scams as legitimate messages. Alongside emails, scammers may also use text messages, automated calls and malicious websites to exploit you.

Always validate suspicious URLs or links

Phishing is an attempt to trick you into revealing critical personal or financial information, like a password or bank details. It can take many forms, such as a fake login page. To avoid getting phished, never click on questionable links; double-check the URL — by hovering over the link or long-pressing the text on mobile — to make sure that the website or app is legitimate; and make sure that the URL begins with 'https'.

Watch out for impersonators

Scammers might pose as legitimate organisations like the Government or a charity. Always proceed with caution when reading messages from someone claiming to be an authoritative resource. If someone that you know emails you but the message seems odd, their account may have been hacked. Don’t reply to the message or click any links unless you can confirm the email is legitimate. Look out for things like urgent requests for money, sob stories about being stranded abroad, or the person claiming that their phone was stolen and cannot be called.

Beware of email scams or requests for personal information

Messages from strangers can be suspect, and even a communication from someone that you trust, like your bank, might be an impersonation. Don't reply to suspicious emails, instant messages or pop-up windows that ask for personal information. Never click suspicious links or enter personal information in questionable forms or surveys. If asked to donate to charity, go directly to the organisation's website to donate rather than clicking on the link sent to you.

Double-check files before downloading

Some sophisticated phishing attacks can occur through infected documents and PDF attachments. If you come across a suspicious attachment, use Chrome or Google Drive to open it. We’ll automatically scan the file and warn you if we detect a virus.

Know how scammers might reach you

Scammers can take advantage of goodwill by disguising their scams as legitimate messages. Alongside emails, scammers may also use text messages, automated calls and malicious websites to exploit you.

Always validate suspicious URLs or links

Phishing is an attempt to trick you into revealing critical personal or financial information, like a password or bank details. It can take many forms, such as a fake login page. To avoid getting phished, never click on questionable links; double-check the URL — by hovering over the link or long-pressing the text on mobile — to make sure that the website or app is legitimate; and make sure that the URL begins with 'https'.

Watch out for impersonators

Scammers might pose as legitimate organisations like the Government or a charity. Always proceed with caution when reading messages from someone claiming to be an authoritative resource. If someone that you know emails you but the message seems odd, their account may have been hacked. Don’t reply to the message or click any links unless you can confirm the email is legitimate. Look out for things like urgent requests for money, sob stories about being stranded abroad, or the person claiming that their phone was stolen and cannot be called.

Beware of email scams or requests for personal information

Messages from strangers can be suspect, and even a communication from someone that you trust, like your bank, might be an impersonation. Don't reply to suspicious emails, instant messages or pop-up windows that ask for personal information. Never click suspicious links or enter personal information in questionable forms or surveys. If asked to donate to charity, go directly to the organisation's website to donate rather than clicking on the link sent to you.

Double-check files before downloading

Some sophisticated phishing attacks can occur through infected documents and PDF attachments. If you come across a suspicious attachment, use Chrome or Google Drive to open it. We’ll automatically scan the file and warn you if we detect a virus.

Explore more ways that we
keep you safe online.